Published on:

Judge Fallon recommends denying motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction

By

In a recent Report and Recommendation, Magistrate Judge Sherry R. Fallon recommended denying foreign defendants TCL Communication Technology Holdings Limited (“TCL Holdings”) and TCT Mobile Limited’s (“TCT Hong Kong”) motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction. Godo Kaisha IP Bridge 1 v. TCL Communication Technology  Holdings Limited, C.A. No. 15-634-SLR-SRF (D. Del. Aug. 17, 2016). Judge Fallon found that personal jurisdiction was proper under various sections of the Delaware long-arm statute. First, Judge Fallon found that jurisdiction was proper under subsection (c)(1) because “TCT Hong Kong and TCL Holdings made direct sales of Accused Products to Delaware customers through their respective websites,” and therefore transacted business in Delaware. Id. at 9-10. Judge Fallon also found that section (c)(3) was satisfied because TCT Hong Kong and TCL Holdings caused tortious injury in Delaware, as they caused to be sold through a website or an Amazon storefront accused products to Delaware customers. See id. at 10. Finally, Judge Fallon found that jurisdiction was proper under a “dual jurisdiction” or “stream of commerce” theory, which combines subsections (c)(1) and (c)(4). Under this theory, Judge Fallon concluded that TCL Holdings and TCT Hong Kong “intended to serve the United States market without excluding Delaware, thereby satisfying the first prong of the dual jurisdiction analysis.” Id. at 13. Judge Fallon noted that “[t]he record in the present case establishes TCT Hong Kong’s intent to serve the Delaware market by manufacturing and selling phones, which it actively markets in the United States and distributes through national retailers like Best Buy.” Id. at 12.

Judge Fallon also found that exercising jurisdiction over the TCL Holdings and TCT Hong Kong comported with due process. Judge Fallon explained that evidence showed “TCL Holdings and TCT Hong Kong purposefully availed themselves of the privilege of conducting business in Delaware by introducing their products in the United States market with the knowledge that some of those products would end up in Delaware and they should anticipate being sued in Delaware.” Id. at 16.

Godo Kaisha IP Bridge 1 v. TCL Communication Technology Holdings Limited, C.A. No. 15-634-SLR-SRF (D. Del. Aug. 17, 2016).

Contact Information