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Judge Andrews denies in part motion to redact hearing transcript

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In a recent Order, Judge Richard G. Andrews denied in part defendant’s motion to redact a hearing transcript. M2M Solutions LLC v. Motorola Solutions Inc., C.A. No. 12-33-RGA (D. Del. Feb. 2, 2016). Judge Andrews granted the motion with respect to portions of the transcript regarding profits, third party license agreement royalties, and the index, but denied the remainder of the motion. Judge Andrews was unpersuaded that the “disclosure of the other information will work any clearly defined and serious injury to [defendant].”

Judge Andrews’ decision was guided by Mosaid Tech Inc. v. LSI Corp., 878 F. Supp. 2d 503 (D. Del. 2012) and the factors set forth in Pansy v. Borough of Stroudsburg, 23 F.3d 772 (3d Cir. 1994). Judge Andrews explained as follows:

Simply because the parties have designated the information as confidential, highly confidential, confidential – attorneys’ eyes only, etc., under a protective order is irrelevant to the present issue, that is, whether the information should be redacted from a judicial transcript. There is not much public interest in the information that is exchanged in discovery. Once, however, it is disclosed in a judicial proceedings, it is in the public interest to be able to understand the proceedings before a judge, and redaction of the transcript hinders that public interest. Nevertheless, there are things that might be appropriately sealed in a public proceeding, such as the pricing terms in license agreements, some other non-public financial information, trade secrets, and other proprietary technology. Information in a transcript may hint at some of these things without actually threatening any “clearly defined and serious injury.” Things that typically weigh against the necessity of sealing include that the information is old, or general, or already in the public record, and was relevant to the judicial proceeding. Further, if there is a need for redactions, the proposed redactions should be as narrow as possible.

Judge Andrews also noted that defendant had not “submitted an affidavit/declaration in support of its motion.”

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