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Judge Robinson grants motion to dismiss in part based on lack of patentable subject matter

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In a memorandum opinion, Judge Sue L. Robinson granted and denied in part defendants’ motion to dismiss plaintiffs’ claims of infringement of U.S. Patent Nos. 7,664,701 (“the ’701 patent:), 8,083,137 (“the ’137 patent”), 7,603,382 (“the ’382 patent”), and 7,260,587 (“the ’587 patent”) based on the failure of those patents to recite patentable subject matter pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 101. Intellectual Ventures I LLC et al. v. Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company, C.A. No. 13-1274-SLR (D. Del. Dec. 18, 2014).

First, Judge Robinson determined that the Court “may proceed on a § 101 analysis” without a claim construction, “as the parties’ arguments are not focused on specific claim limitations, but instead on the broader concepts of the claims and the computer components used.” Id. at 9-10.

Judge Robinson then relied on the two-step framework set forth in Alice Corp. Ply. Ltd. v. CLS Bank Int’l, 134 S.Ct. 2347(2014) to assess the subject matter eligibility of each of the asserted patents. Starting with the ’137 Patent, Judge Robinson noted that it disclosed “a system and method which allows consumer users to establish self-imposed limits on the user’s spending (borrowing) such that when the limit is reached the consuming user is notified,” which Judge Robinson determined to be a “longstanding and fundamental practice, utilized in personal and business finances” under the first prong of Alice. Id. at 11-12. Turning to Alice’s second prong, Judge Robinson found that plaintiffs’ arguments failed, given that an “abstract idea implemented on a computer [that] allows for more or faster monitoring of accounts is not the crux of the patentability analysis.” Id. at 13. Judge Robinson further noted that “[t]he computer and components (central processor) described in the specification are generic. The database is also generic; the specification does not describe a ‘specially programmed database,’ but a database used to store data.” Id. at 14. Judge Robinson further explained that the recitation of a “means for storing,” a “means for presenting transaction summary data,” and a “means for listing,” did not change the analysis, “as only generic computers and components are disclosed in the specification.” Id. at 15. Judge Robinson thus found the ’137 patent invalid for lack of patentable subject matter. Id. at 15-16.

Addressing the ’832 patent, Judge Robinson noted that it is directed to “a system for selectively tailoring information delivered to an Internet user depending upon the particular needs of the user.” Id. at 16. Judge Robinson explained that “[i]nstead of working in a ‘normal, expected manner,’ the ’382 patent describes an idea and solution for customized web page content, [and] thus, ‘the claimed solution is necessarily rooted in computer technology in order to overcome a problem specifically arising in the realm of computer networks.’” Id. at 18. Judge Robinson therefore found that the ’832 patent recites patentable subject matter.

Turning to the ’587 patent, Judge Robinson noted that it disclosed “a method, system and apparatus for automatically organizing a large number of images that may be obtained from a variety of different sources,” which was found to be “akin to a computerized photo album, a routine and conventional idea” under the first prong of Alice. Id. at 20. As to the second prong, Judge Robinson found that “[t]he claims do no more than ‘computerize’ a known idea for organizing images” and therefore concluded that the ’587 patent was invalid for lack of patentable subject matter. Id. at 21-22.

As to the ’701 patent, Judge Robinson noted that the patent’s central idea is directed to “providing a user with aliases to use in conducting transactions,” which was found to be an “abstract idea” under Alice’s first prong, given that “[t]he use of aliases to maintain privacy in financial transactions is not limited to Internet transactions.” Id. at 22-23. Pursuant to the second prong, Judge Robinson noted that “in order to pass muster under § 101, it is no longer sufficient to use the Internet through generic computer components to achieve a useful result.” Judge Robinson determined that the ’701 patent fell under such a category, and thus found the ’701 patent was invalid for failure to recite patentable subject matter. Id. at 25-26.

 

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