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Judge Robinson denies defendants’ request to preclude prior art from trial

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In a recent memorandum order, Judge Sue L. Robinson denied defendants’ request to preclude plaintiffs “from presenting testimony or evidence relating to [defendants’] prior product ActiTUF.” Invista North America S.A.R.L. et al. v. M&G USA Corp. et al., C.A. No. 11-1007-SLR-CJB (D. Del. Jul. 16, 2013). Defendants argued that “ActiTUF is a plastics product with an iron-based system, rather than the cobalt-based system allegedly developed by [plaintiffs],” and thus “testimony or evidence relating to ActiTUF is not relevant to the issues at trial and will likely confuse a jury.” Id. at 1. Plaintiffs, on the other hand, argued that “ActiTUF is relevant to at least the state of the art at the time of the invention and secondary considerations.” Id. Specifically, plaintiffs asserted that they would “present evidence at trial regarding how the inventors of its claimed inventions looked to improve on the problems with ActiTUF’s iron-based system.” Id. at 2. Ultimately denying defendants’ request, Judge Robinson found that, “although ActiTUF is not an accused product in this litigation, testimony or evidence relating to it is relevant to the state of the art at the time of the invention and secondary considerations.” Id. She also noted that “[s]uch evidence would not likely confuse a jury because there is no dispute that ActiTUF uses a different approach and is not covered by the patents at issue.” Id.

Invista North America S.A.R.L. et al. v. M&G USA Corp. et al., C.A. No. 11-1007-SLR-CJB (D. Del. Jul….

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