Articles Posted in Leonard P. Stark, Chief Judge

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Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark has adopted Magistrate Judge Burke’s Report and Recommendation in Forest Laboratories, Inc., et al. v. Amneal Pharmaceuticals, C.A. No. 14-508-LPS, in which Judge Burke denied defendant Mylan’s motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction.  As observed in the Order, two recent decisions regarding similar issues of personal jurisdiction over Mylan – Acorda and AstraZeneca - were certified for interlocutory appeal before the Federal Circuit and the Federal Circuit has granted Mylan permission to appeal these decisions.  Memorandum Order at 2 (D. Del. Mar. 30, 2015).  Per this Order, either party may similarly file a motion to certify for interlocutory appeal.

The Court reviewed the motion de novo, explaining that “[g]iven the detailed reasoning provided in the Report, as well as the lengthy discussion of the jurisdictional issues in Acorda, and further given that Mylan has in the instant case raised no arguments that are not adequately addressed in Judge Burke’s report and/or Acorda, the Court finds it unnecessary to address Mylan’s Motion to Dismiss or its Objections any further.”  Id. at 3.

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Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark recently decided the parties’ motions to preclude expert testimony in Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation v. Power Integrations, Inc., C.A. No. 12-540-LPS (D. Del. Mar. 20, 2015).  Judge Stark granted Power Integrations’ motion as to Fairchild’s claim for damages for alleged inducement because Fairchild’s expert used the wrong date for his hypothetical negotiation.  Id. at 2.  In particular, Fairchild’s expert failed to consider a 2012 jury verdict in prior litigation between the parties in which the jury found no inducement of the patent-in-suit.  Id.  However, because both parties’ experts relied on the same incorrect date, Judge Stark gave both sides the opportunity to serve supplemental expert reports to correct the hypothetical negotiation date.  Id. at 3.

Judge Stark denied Fairchild’s motion to preclude Power Integrations’ technical expert finding that he did not import new limitations into two claim terms and provided adequate support for his opinion that the patent-in-suit was invalid under 35 U.S.C. § 112.  Id. at 3-4.  Judge Stark did, however, grant Fairchild’s motion as to Power Integrations’ damages expert.  Judge Stark determined that the expert improperly apportioned value between infringing and non-infringing products because he “did not analyze Fairchild’s accused products, relying instead on an apportionment based on [Power Integrations’] products, based on his belief that those products would have a relative value in the marketplace similar to what is exhibited by the Power Integrations products.”  Id. at 7 (internal quotation omitted).  Judge Stark also determined that the expert used an improper rule of thumb when beginning his analysis with “an assumption that up to 80% of value may be attributable to intellectual property, based on research showing that 80% of a high tech company’s value consists of intangible value, such as intellectual property.”  Id. at 8.

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In a recent Memorandum Order, Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark ruled on two issues following the pretrial conference. Intellectual Ventures I LLC v. Symantec Corp., C.A. No. 10-1067-LPS (D. Del. Jan. 21, 2015). First, Judge Stark ruled that “[t]he two newly-accused products will not be the subject of the trial beginning next week.” Id. at 1. Judge Stark provided this ruling, however, without prejudice to plaintiff “to seek relief related to [the newly-accused products] through an appropriate post-trial proceeding in this case or by filing a new suit.” Id.

Second, Judge Stark found that defendant would “not be permitted to present its false marking ‘defense’ at the forthcoming trial.” Id. Judge Stark explained that with respect to two of the three asserted patents, plaintiff is asserting only method claims, and “the marking requirement does not apply to method claims.” Id. With respect to the remaining patent-in-suit, Judge Stark found that “as an exercise of its discretion and as proper case management, that it would be unfairly prejudicial to [plaintiff] to allow [defendant], at nearly the final moment before trial (i.e., listing it as a contested issue in the proposed pretrial order), to put [plaintiff] in a position in which it must prove that it (or its predecessors and/or licensees) marked [its] embodiments.” Id. at 2. Specifically, defendant “mistakenly or misleadingly” identified failure to mark as an affirmative defense in its answer, but did not discuss § 287 in its responses to interrogatories, did not provide expert discovery on failure to mark, and did not propose a jury instruction on failure to mark at the time the parties exchanged instruction proposals. Id. On balance, Judge Stark determined that defendant “failed to give [plaintiff] adequate, meaningful notice that it contested marking,” and defendant therefore “waived and/or abandoned its right to contest marking at the forthcoming trial.” Id. at 2-3.

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Chief Judge Stark recently issued a memorandum order with helpful guidance for parties regarding jury instructions in patent infringement cases. His Honor explained that an instruction on the entire market value rule should be read to the jury, “as doing so will assist the jurors’ understanding of the evidence on damages,” but that an “overly narrow” interpretation of the law governing the entire market value rule would be rejected. Intellectual Ventures I LLC v. Symantec Corp., C.A. No. 10-1067-LPS, Memo. Or. at 1 (D. Del. Jan. 23, 2014). Such an instruction should be read, Judge Stark explained, both when the plaintiff’s expert first addressed entire market value rule damages and again as part of final instructions. Id.

The specific instructions adopted by Judge Stark on the entire market value rule, reasonable royalty, the Georgia-Pacific factors, and damages generally are found in the Court’s order below.

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Chief Judge Stark recently granted Defendant Trend Micro’s motion to transfer a patent infringement suit brought by Selene Communication Technologies to the Northern District of California. Considering the Third Circuit’s Jumara factors, His Honor found “that the factors, in total, weigh sufficiently strongly in favor of transfer.” Selene Commc’n Techs., LLC v. Trend Micro Inc., et al., C.A. No. 14-435-LPS, Memo. Or. at 1 (D. Del. Jan. 16, 2015).

Initially, Judge Stark explained that the plaintiff’s choice of forum and incorporation in Delaware were not dispositive. “[T]he deference to be given to Selene’s choice of forum is reduced because Selene’s principal place of business is in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Additionally, Selene was only created in 2011 and has only owned the patent-in-suit since July 2013.” Id. at 1-2.

On the other hand, the defendants’ choice of forum weighed in favor of transfer because one defendant is a California corporation and the other is a Delaware corporation, but both have significant operations in Cupertino, California. Thus, “Defendants have legitimate and rational reasons for their choice of forum, and therefore, it is entitled to weight, but not the same weight as Plaintiffs’ choice of forum.” Id. at 2. The location where the claim arose also weighed in favor of transfer because “research and development of the allegedly infringing products occurred primarily in the Northern District” of California and “the patent-in-suit was, until July 2013, held by . . . a California company with a principal place of business in Menlo Park, California, meaning that any harm from infringement prior to that date was suffered primarily in the Northern District.” Id. at 2-3. Additionally, the convenience of witnesses weighed in favor of transfer because, although there was no evidence that third party witnesses would refuse to testify without a subpoena, three of the four inventors reside in the Northern District. Id. at 3.

Judge Stark concluded: “The remaining Jumara factors are either neutral or slightly favor transfer. Overall, then, the Court concludes that Trend Micro has met its burden to show that the pertinent factors weigh strongly in favor of transfer.” Id. at 3-4.

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Chief Judge Stark recently denied a plaintiff’s Rule 60 motion to set aside a jury verdict.  Power Integrations, Inc. v. Fairchild Semiconductor Int’l Inc., et al., C.A. No. 08-309-LPS (D. Del. Jan. 13, 2015).  Judge Stark found the motion was untimely, coming more than 30 months after the verdict and 19 months after the Court’s rulings on post-trial motions.  Further, the Court found that the plaintiff had not identified any new evidence that existed at trial but were not discoverable at that time.  Rather, the Court explained the motion was based on evidence which came into existence after trial through events occurring in a related case and reexamination.

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Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark recently considered a motion dismiss plaintiff’s ANDA infringement action for lack of personal jurisdiction, applying the recent Supreme Court decision Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014).  Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. v. Mylan Pharms. Inc., C.A. No. 14-935-LPS (D. Del. Jan. 14, 2015).  Judge Stark agreed that Daimler “altered the analysis with respect to general jurisdiction[,]” but unlike the recent decision by Judge Sleet, found that “Mylan Pharma consented to this Court’s exercise of personal jurisdiction when it registered to do business and appointed an agent for service of process in the State of Delaware.”  Id. at 1.  Regarding Mylan Pharma’s co-defendant and corporate parent, Mylan Inc., while it is not registered to do business in Delaware, Plaintiffs allege “a non-frivolous claim that Mylan Inc. used Mylan Pharma as its agent in connection with the ANDA filing giving rise to this litigation.”  Id. at 2.  Therefore, as to Mylan Inc., jurisdictional discovery was warranted.

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In ongoing litigation between Plaintiff Flatworld Interactives and Defendants Samsung and LG, Chief Judge Stark recently ruled on several summary judgment motions, in addition to construing the parties’ disputed claim terms in a separate opinion. Flatworld Interactives LLC v. Samsung Elecs. Co., Ltd., et al., C.A. No. 12-804-LPS, 12-964-LPS, Memo. Op. at 7-16 (D. Del. Dec. 31, 2014).

By their motion for summary judgment of invalidity, the Defendants contended that the patent-in-suit lacked written description because the claims contained a negative limitation that was not disclosed in the specification. As Judge Stark explained, “[u]nder§ 112(a), negative claim limitations are ‘adequately supported when the specification describes a reason to exclude the relevant limitation.’ ‘Such written description support need not rise to the level of disclaimer. In fact, it is possible for the patentee to support both the inclusion and exclusion of the same material.’” Id. at 9 (citations omitted). Judge Stark agreed that there was a negative claim limitation but found a question of fact as to whether the specification discloses that limitation to a person of ordinary skill:

“[T]he specification teaches a person of ordinary skill that once the image is removed from the screen, nothing related to it is left behind. The reason for excluding any representative of the removed image may be discerned from the specification. . . . At least certain of the specific embodiments disclosed, such as the ‘hide-and-go-seek’ function or ‘guessing game’ function, necessitate that not only the image itself but also any representative thereof be completely removed from the screen.”

Id. at 9-10. Judge Stark also granted the Defendants’ motion to strike a declaration filed in support of Plaintiff’s summary judgment motion because His Honor would have denied the motion for summary judgment even without consideration of the declaration. This “decision to strike the declaration [was, however,] without prejudice to Plaintiff’s ability to attempt to rely on [the declarant] at a later point in this case.” Id. at 7.

The Defendants also filed a motion for summary judgment to limit damages. The first issue implicated by this motion was whether the Plaintiff was required to mark embodiments of the patent-in-suit during the time in which the patent was undergoing reissue proceedings in the Patent Office. The parties cited no authority addressing this question, but the Plaintiff argued that marking could not be required because of the potential for false marking if the reissue resulted in no issued claims. Id. at 10-11. Based on 35 U.S.C. § 252, however, Judge Stark explained that “[t]he surrender of the original patent shall take effect upon the issue of the reissued patent. That is, a patent undergoing reissue remains in force during the reissue proceedings, and an accused infringer may be liable for infringing activity occurring during the reissue prosecution.” Id. at 11 (emphasis Court’s). “As a result,” the Court concluded, “§ 287 applied and required marking,” which “comports with the underlying purposes of § 287.” Id. at 11-12.

Judge Stark further found that there was no constructive notice of the patent-in-suit because the Plaintiff’s failure to mark the single embodiment of the patent-in-suit was not de minimis. The de minimis exception applies to “for example, failure by mistake to mark a few articles in hundreds of thousands made and sold” and for a “patentee whose compliance with the marking statute is nearly perfect.” Id. at 13 (citations omitted) (emphasis Court’s). Importantly, the pertinent comparison is between the number of marked and unmarked embodiments made, offered, sold, or imported by the patentee, not a comparison between the patentee’s and the accused infringers’ embodiments.” Id. at 14 (emphasis Court’s).

Finally, Judge Stark found that the evidence demonstrated that the Plaintiff did not provide actual notice to the Defendants. The Plaintiff’s only evidence of actual notice was a letter allegedly sent to the Defendants notifying them of the reissue proceedings of the patent-in-suit and inviting them to submit relevant prior art. “The letter does not mention infringement, or even a specific product. The letter cannot be read to constitute the required affirmative communication of a ‘specific charge of infringement’ by a ‘specific accused product.’ At bottom, the letter failed to provide actual notice.” Id. at 14-15.

Accordingly, the Court granted the summary judgment motion to limit damages: “[N]o reasonable juror could conclude that Plaintiff provided Defendants actual notice. In combination with the Court’s determinations that the notice obligation was not excused by the pendency of the reissue proceedings, and that Plaintiff also failed to provide Defendants constructive notice, the result is that Defendants’ motion for summary judgment to limit damages based on Plaintiff’s failure to mark must be granted. Plaintiff may only recover, at most, damages accruing after the date the complaint was filed in the respective actions against Samsung and LG.” Id. at 16.

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Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark recently issued a Memorandum Order on several of the parties various motions in limine filed in advance of an upcoming pretrial conference on January 9.  Intellectual Ventures I LLC v. Symantec Corporation, C.A. No. 10-1067-LPS (D. Del. Jan. 6, 2015).  Judge Stark granted plaintiff’s motions to preclude any evidence from defendant disparaging plaintiff’s business model and practices (such as referring to plaintiff as a “patent troll”), or disparaging the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  Id. at 1, 2.  Judge Stark also granted plaintiff’s motion to preclude reference to reexamination proceedings of the patent-in-suit because any probative value is outweighed by the risk of unfair prejudice and jury confusion.  Id. at 1-2.  Judge Stark granted defendant’s motion to preclude evidence of pre-suit knowledge of the patent-in-suit because “[n]o claims of willful infringement, indirect infringement, or copying will be the subject of the forthcoming trial.”  Id. at 3.

Plaintiff also requested that the Court order defendant to limit the number of prior art references, obviousness combinations, and witnesses it will present at trial.  Judge Stark denied the request noting that the parties can “make their own decisions as to how to make the best and most effective use of the limited, albeit sufficient, amount of time they will be given for their presentations at trial, which they are reminded will be no more than 20-24 hours per side.”  Id. at 3-4.

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In two opinions filed last week, Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark denied defendant’s motions for summary judgment of invalidity, non-infringement, and no standing in Transcenic, Inc. v. Google, Inc., C.A. No. 11-582-LPS (D. Del. Dec. 22, 2014) (“Standing Opinion” and “Invalidity/Noninfringement Opinion”).

As to invalidity and noninfringement, the motions largely constituted a “’battle of the experts that is not amenable to resolution prior to the presentation of evidence, including testimony,” Invalidity/Noninfringement Opinion at 3, and that genuine issues of material fact remained.

As to standing, the Court concluded that no valid assignment contract existed between the inventor and his employer (an alleged assignee), and even if there was one, the assignment obligation would not cover the patent-in-suit. Standing Opinion at 5-6. “[B]ecause [defendant] only present[ed] evidence regarding the relatedness of the patent-in-suit to [the business of the entity that later acquired the inventor’s employer], no reasonable juror could find that [the inventor’s] invention was related to the business of [the employer].” Id. at 6. As a result, defendant’s arguments as to lack of standing failed, and the Court granted plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment regarding the standing defense. Id.

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